JA In The News | Junior Achievement of Chicago

JA is Really Newsworthy!

Honda Empowers the Future!

American Honda Finance Corporation partnered with JA USA to bring JA programs to thousands of students. JA of Chicago was one of the grantees. Honda’s grant sponsored 5 JA programs at Elgin High School, including JA Personal Finance. Here is what some of the educators had to say about JA and this impactful program:

“I would definitely volunteer with JA again.  I love the content and have no doubt there will be some students who will remember this program in their later years.”

“The Junior Achievement program gives young people something a school curriculum does not….practical economic and financial lessons and tools that will help them make decisions that will have a lasting impact on their life.  I wish we had these programs where I attended school.”

“I had the pleasure of attending all of the sessions that my company hosted and my absolute favorite session was the one where they had to plan a party.  The students soon learned the hard lesson of having their budget slashed because of an unexpected expense.  It was fun seeing how creative they could be with their new budget and party planning.  The program really brings to light the importance of finance to kids that are about to go off into the world.  If my company offers the opportunity I would definitely participate again.”

Thank you to American Honda Finance Corporation and Elgin High School for partnering with JA to empower the future!

Survey: Teen Girls’ Interest in STEM Careers Declines

A new survey by Junior Achievement (JA) conducted by the research group Engine shows that only 9 percent of girls between ages of 13 and 17 are interested in careers in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math). This is down from 11 percent from a similar survey in 2018. Teen boys’ interest in STEM careers increased slightly to 27 percent, up from 24 percent in 2018. The survey of 1,004 teens was conducted from April 16 to 21, 2019.

“The decline of interest in STEM careers is disappointing given how much emphasis is being placed on promoting STEM to girls,” said Maria Ramos, VP of City Operations for JA of Chicago. “One element that may need to be emphasized more is ensuring that STEM professionals are serving as role models and working with girls in educational settings as part of these initiatives.”

2009 study from MIT indicates that young people are interested in STEM at an early age, but begin to lose interest as they become older due to a lack of interaction with mentors and role models in the STEM fields. A way Junior Achievement is addressing this is by bringing STEM professionals into classrooms to deliver the organization’s career-readiness programs. (Include any local information related to programs specifically designed to emphasize STEM or girls in STEM).

Other findings from the survey include:

  • 85 percent of teens say they know what kind of job they want after graduation, down slightly from 88 percent in 2018.
  • While girls’ interest in STEM careers like engineering, robotics and computer science declined, their interest in careers in the medical and dental fields increased to 25 percent, up from 19 percent in 2018.
  • Half of all teens (51%) expect to work this summer. However, more than two-thirds of 16- and 17-year-olds (69%) expect to have a summer job.
  • Top summer jobs include retail (26%) and food service (26%). These are followed by outdoor work (17%) and babysitting/child care (14%). Very few (5%) anticipate working in an office over the summer.

Methodology

This report presents the findings of a Youth CARAVAN survey conducted by Engine among a sample of 1,004 13-17-year olds, comprising of 502 males and 502 females.  This survey was live on April 16-21, 2019.  

Respondents for this survey are selected from among those who have volunteered to participate in online surveys and polls.  Because the sample is based on those who initially self-selected for participation, no estimates of sampling error can be calculated.  All sample surveys and polls may be subject to multiple sources of error, including, but not limited to sampling error, coverage error, error associated with nonresponse, error associated with question wording and response options.

 

Honda Empowers the Future!

American Honda Finance Corporation partnered with JA USA to bring JA programs to thousands of students. JA of Chicago was one of the grantees. Honda's grant sponsored 5 JA programs at Elgin High School, including JA Personal Finance. Here is what some of the educators had to say about JA and this impactful program:

"It’s good for my students to hear about the various career paths and options from other adults. Each speaker brings value to my students and a way of envisioning their futures."

"Students need to hear from other adults in order to have a vision of their lives.  What the speakers say reinforces the messages I send every day."

"Students get to see successful adults other than their teachers or coaches.  They get to see success first hand and learning valuable life lessons in the process."

"I think the lesson about them planning their budget and surviving on their own will help students immensley. I think the students got a lot out of it!"

Thank you to American Honda Finance Corporation and Elgin High School for partnering with JA to empower th future!

In celebration of our Centennial, AIG and Junior Achievement Help Prepare Local Students for Life and the Workplace

Students will learn important entrepreneurship, financial literacy and work readiness skills, thanks to a generous support from AIG that will implement Junior Achievement (JA) programs in Chicago schools.
 
“One of Junior Achievement’s main goals is to empower young people to own their economic success by helping them understand the benefits of saving, budgeting and investing,” said Maria Ramos, VP of City Operations for JA of Chicago. “We’re pleased to celebrate AIG’s and JA’s centennial by providing the knowledge, mentorship and resources necessary through this partnership to help our young people grow up to be successful adults.”
 
"We are on a mission to ensure that every American achieves a secure, fulfilling retirement, and that includes kids," said Rob Scheinerman, President of AIG Group Retirement. "Whether for teens or adults, through the work we do with Junior Achievement and other financial literacy efforts we support, we want to help people gain a deeper understanding of the importance of lifetime income, realize the true cost of retirement, and develop a solid plan for the future."
 
AIG has been a longtime strategic partner and friend of JA. In its sixth year, AIG, has gifted funds to support Junior Achievement programs, as well as recruited and trained employee volunteers to help students gain the knowledge and skills they need to make smart academic and economic choices. This year’s grant will serve schools in 22 locations, including: Amarillo, Texas; Atlanta; Berkeley Heights, NJ; Boston; Chicago; Cleveland; Dallas; Houston; Los Angeles; Nashville; New York; Stevens Point, Wisconsin; Dublin, Ireland; Jakarta, Indonesia; Johannesburg, South Africa; Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; London, England; Muntinlupa City, Philippines; Nairobi, Kenya; Quito, Ecuador; Sao Paulo, Brazil; and Toronto, Ontario. As part of the partnership, AIG employees will engage as dedicated classroom teachers, capstone volunteers and board members, as well as support other special events. \
 
"AIG partners with organizations like Junior Achievement to help young people obtain the information they need to be more prepared for and to feel more confident about their futures," said Laura Gallagher, Global Head of Corporate Citizenship at AIG. Junior Achievement’s programs are in direct correlation with AIG’s commitment to supporting financial education and workforce readiness. 
 

69 Percent of Teens Support “Debt-Free College;” Drops to 33 Percent if it Means “Higher Taxes”

A new survey by Junior Achievement (JA) conducted by the research group Engine shows that more than two-thirds (69%) of teens between the ages of 13 and 17 support the idea of “debt-free college.” However, that support drops to a third (33%) if it’s paid for with higher taxes. The survey of 1,004 teens was conducted from April 16 to 21, 2019.
 
“With total student loan debt approaching $1.6 trillion dollars, it’s not surprising today’s teens support proposals like debt-free college,” said Maria Ramos, VP of City Operations for JA of Chicago. “This survey shows, however, that while many teens are supportive of these proposals, they may not have a full understanding of the financial aspects involved.”
 
The survey also found that nearly all teens (94%) plan to go to college. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), 69.7 percent of U.S. high school graduates enrolled in college in 2016. Just under a third (30%) of survey respondents said they expected to take out student loans to help pay for college, while nearly a fourth (22%) expected to find other ways to pay for college and the rest (41%) were unsure of how they would pay for college. According to The Institute for College Access & Success, 71 percent of U.S. college graduates have student loan debt.
 
“When it comes to paying for college, these results indicate many teens simply haven’t given it much thought. As a result, they are going to be more inclined to borrow when they are in college,” added Ramos. “One way to help better prepare young people to make informed decisions about paying for college is through programs like Junior Achievement.” 
 
Methodology
This report presents the findings of a Youth CARAVAN survey conducted by Engine among a sample of 1,004 13-17-year olds, comprising of 502 males and 502 females.  This survey was live on April 16-21, 2019.  
 
Respondents for this survey are selected from among those who have volunteered to participate in online surveys and polls.  Because the sample is based on those who initially self-selected for participation, no estimates of sampling error can be calculated.  All sample surveys and polls may be subject to multiple sources of error, including, but not limited to sampling error, coverage error, error associated with nonresponse, error associated with question wording and response options.
 

JA for a Day at Yost Elementary

This article was orginally published by Duneland School News on 3/14/19.
 
Chesterton High School and Junior Achievement of Chicago participated in a JA in a Day program at Newton Yost Elementary School on March 5, 2019.
 
The 23 CHS cadet teacher students taught 18 grade K-4 JA programs to over 300 Yost students. This collaboration allowed the CHS students to fulfill their required senior service hours as well as gain valuable teaching experience to fulfill requirements for the cadet teaching program. It also allowed Newton Yost Elementary to participate in a whole-school JA program. The CHS students will also be eligible for scholarships through Junior Achievement’s High School Heroes program. Junior Achievement provides programs that teach financial literacy, responsibility, and entrepreneurship to students in grades K-12.
 
CHS cadet teachers participating at Yost were Fatima Ahmad, Anna Anton, Victoria Balon, Shelby Bullock, Karissa Carter, Audrey Clinkert, Melina Condie, Anthony Frencl, Sarah Kaiser, Hannah Lange, Haydn Malackowski, Hannah Manske, Madelyn Matthys, Emma Olson, Evelyn Pabon, Priscilla Sabourin, Caroline Scheidt, Kaitlyn Shideler, Ariana Smith, Madeline Smith, Madison Torok, Chad Whelan and Mackenzie Wielgos.

JA Champion Highlight: NIPSCO

JA's Northwest Indiana Division's annual fundraiser is just around the corner and we're highlighting some of the regions JA Champions that will honored at the event. 

Our first Champion highlight is the Northern Indiana Public Service Company (NIPSCO). NIPSCO has been in the region for 107 years and has had a strong partnership with JA for more than 25 years! Rick Calinski and Marcia Hardison of NIPSCO Public Affairs & Communications coordinate the company's work with JA and shared a bit about their paritipcaiton with our organization:

Why does NIPSCO support Junior Achievement?

As part of NIPSCO’s corporate citizenship, education and helping to prepare the next generation with the tools they need to succeed, including partnerships with local schools, is one giving area our employees are passionate about getting involved with. Working with JA to help students gain the basic skills to become contributing members of our communities is key to helping those students and communities continue their successes.

How did NIPSCO get involved with JA?

Rick: When I started with NIPSCO we were looking for ways to touch the youth in our community. We thought about putting together a program on energy but after discussing some options with JA, NIPSCO felt their program was ideal for company volunteerism. We have never looked back and have many of the same volunteers year after year.

Marcia: I was involved in JA programs throughout junior high and high school. When I heard that NIPSCO partnered with JA in area schools by getting our employees in front of students, it was a natural fit!

How has your JA experience have changed or influenced employees and yourself?

Employees gain a sense of satisfaction that they’ve helped to make a difference in the lives of the students they touch when participating in JA programs. Teaching these children basic skills so they can succeed is a no-brainer and one that our employees are passionate about. The phrase, “It takes a village.” couldn’t be more accurate.

What has the company gained by your involvement in JA?

To be seen as a good corporate citizen within our communities and help the future – our children! – be able to succeed in as many ways as possible.

The gratitude shared by the students after our time with them is over is heartfelt and heartwarming. Knowing we made a difference in the small amount of time we were able to interact with the classroom is a great feeling – one that helps motivate our employees to continue to support this wonderful organization!

Thee 3rd Annual Prom Gala: Mardi Gras will take place Friday, March 8, 2019 at Avalon Manor (3550 US- 30, Merrillville IN 46410). Click here to learn more.

U.S. PRESIDENT'S VOLUNTEER SERVICE AWARD RECIPIENTS ANNOUNCED

 Junior Achievement USA® (JA) today announced that it will honor Robert Morris University, YMCA of the USA, Accenture, Caterpillar, and BMO Harris Bank with a 2017-2018 U.S. President's Volunteer Service Award. The U.S. President's Volunteer Service Award will be presented to 44 organizations at an awards ceremony and celebration event at the New York Stock Exchange during the JA Volunteer Summit, supported by American Express, on March 12, 2019 in New York, NY. The event will be part of Junior Achievement’s year-long Centennial Celebration.

In 2003, President George W. Bush established the President's Council on Service and Civic Participation (the Council) to recognize the valuable contributions volunteers make in communities and encourage more people to serve. The Council created the President's Volunteer Service Award program as a way to thank and honor individuals who, by their demonstrated commitment and example, inspire others to engage in volunteer service. In 2006, Junior Achievement became an official certifying organization for this award, which recognizes corporations with a U.S. presence that provide volunteers to teach JA programs anywhere in the world.

"Junior Achievement volunteers are important mentors for young people, bringing our programs to life. JA volunteers share their experiences and skills with students while delivering our programs, teaching them how to manage their money, succeed in the workforce, or start a business that creates jobs and grows the economy. JA’s volunteers are critical to our organization’s success and are a vital part of our mission," said Sandy Daffé, President of Junior Achievement of Chicago.

“Junior Achievement volunteers help build communities by empowering the next generation’s success,” said Rick Lenny, Chairman of the Board for Junior Achievement of Chicago. "JA could not exist without the dedication of its volunteers. We are grateful for this opportunity to recognize their invaluable support."

Junior Achievement’s kindergarten through high school programs are delivered across the country by a network of more than 245,000 volunteers, including nearly 14,000 in the Chicago area. JA programs provide innovative, hands-on work readiness, entrepreneurship and financial literacy education to more than 600,000 students in Chicago each year.

The complete list of recipients can be found here.

 

JA Awarded Grant From the Community Foundation of Northern Illinois

JA is proud to announce it has received a grant for the JA Whole School Program in Rockford, Illinois. The grant was awarded by the Dr. Louis and Violet Rubin Fund of the Community Foundation of Northern Illinois’ Community Grants Program.
 
This grant will bring JA's financial literacy, work readiness, and entrepreneurship programming to an entire elementary school through the JA Whole School Program. This program benefits students with JA's sequential programs year after year.
 
"We're excited for this grant from Community Foundation of Northern Illinois and to see the great impact it will make in the Rockford community," said Derek Ernst, VP of Suburban Operations for JA of Chicago.
 
About the Community Foundation of Northern Illinois:
The mission of the Community Foundation of Northern Illinois is to serve as a catalyst for giving in order to attract, preserve, and grow an endowment for current and future needs of Northern Illinois. Since its founding in 1953 CFNIL has granted more than $71 million for charitable purposes. Learn more about CFNIL’s grantmaking and commitment to endowment at cfnil.org.

Catherine Brune to Receive the Junior Achievement National Centennial Leadership Award

Catherine Brune, representing Junior Achievement of Chicago, has been named one of six Junior Achievement National Centennial Leadership Award honorees by the Junior Achievement USA Board of Directors. Coinciding with JA’s Centennial celebration in 2019, these special national awards recognize the outstanding board members, volunteers and supporting companies and organizations who have exemplified exceptional service and support to JA and its mission over the years. The recipients and the JA Areas they represent are:
 
Catherine Brune - JA of Chicago
Mike Curb - JA of Middle Tennessee (Nashville) and JA of Southern California (Los Angeles)
Spencer Eccles - JA of Utah
Jim Hemak - JA of the Upper Midwest (Minneapolis)
James Johnston - JA of Northern Indiana (Fort Wayne)
Pamela Muma - JA of Tampa Bay
 
“Catherine Brune has been a true leader and champion of Junior Achievement in our community for many years, and we are incredibly pleased that Catherine Brune is being recognized with this national award,” said Sandy Daffé, President of JA of Chicago. Catherine Brune’s support is representative of the tremendous dedication of the countless business leaders, educators, volunteers and other community supporters who have been so essential in ensuring JA’s success both here locally and across the country.” 
 
The one-time only Junior Achievement National Centennial Leadership Awards will be presented at the 2019 Junior Achievement Volunteer Summit on Tuesday, March 12 in New York City.  The recipients will be honored with a special luncheon and participate in the ringing of the New York Stock Exchange closing bell. In addition to the national award, JA Areas will also be awarding JA Area Centennial Leadership Awards to local JA leaders who have gone “above and beyond” in their own region.
 

Chicago High School Volunteer Opportunities

JANUARY
Branding Workshops at Chicago Tech Academy 
Date & Time: January 18, 2019 8:30am- 1:00pm
Address: 1301 W 14th St, Chicago, IL 60608
Volunteer Coordinator: Valerie Garcia, at vgarcia@jachicago.org or at 312-715-1300 EXT 229
Information: Looking for volunteers to come to Chicago Tech Academy to teach multiple workshops to High School students about their personal brand. Volunteers will have a chance to engage students in order to craft a 30-second elevator speech and learn about the importance of first impressions in the workplace.
 
Career Fair at Ombudsman Chicago South
Date & Time: January 22nd, 10:00am-2:00pm
Address: 6057 S Western Ave, Chicago, IL 60636
Volunteer Coordinator: Naomi Johnson, at njohnson@jachicago.org or at 708-819-4076
Information: Looking for professionals with a background in the United States armed Forces to speak to students about their career path and education background. You will have your own table and students will visit organizations that they have an interest in. Please consider bringing giveaways, a tablecloth, informational materials, business cards, demonstrations etc. Lunch is provided for volunteers.
 
SOJO Senior Conference at Robert Morris University
Date & Time: January 25nd, 9:30am-2:00pm
Address: 401 S State St. Chicago, IL, 60605
Volunteer Coordinator: Stephanie Ramirez, at sramirez@jachicago.org or at 773-640-3462
Information: Looking for volunteers to help Social Justice High School Seniors develop their soft skill such as interviewing. Volunteers may also be asked to review resumes.
 
Resume Building Workshops at Amundsen High School
Date & Time: January 30th, 8:35am- 3:00pm
Address: 5110 N Damen Ave, Chicago, IL 60625
Volunteer Coordinator: Valerie Garcia, at vgarcia@jachicago.org or at 312-715-1300 EXT 229
Information: Looking for volunteers to teach multiple Resume Building Workshops. Volunteers will teach the same workshop to 4 classes throughout the day. The class times can be found below:
8:35am- 9:20am
11:45am- 12:30pm
1:25pm- 2:10pm
2:15pm- 3:00pm
 
Resume Building Workshops at Amundsen High School
Date & Time: January 31st, 9:35am- 3:00pm
Address: 5110 N Damen Ave, Chicago, IL 60625
Volunteer Coordinator: Valerie Garcia, at vgarcia@jachicago.org or at 312-715-1300 EXT 229
Information: Looking for volunteers to teach multiple Resume Building Workshops. Volunteers will teach the same workshop to 4 classes throughout the day. The class times can be found below:
9:35am- 10:25am
11:25am- 12:15pm
1:15pm- 2:05pm
2:10pm- 3:00pm

FEBRUARY

JA It’s My Business at Maria-Catalyst High School 
Date & Time: February 4th- February 7th 8:00am-3:40pm
Address: 6727 S California Ave, Chicago, IL 60629
Volunteer Coordinator: Stephanie Ramirez, at sramirez@jachicago.org or at 773-640-3462
Information: Looking for professionals to lead sessions of JA It’s My Business. JA It's My Business! encourages students to use entrepreneurial thinking as they explore higher education and career choices. Students participate in fun, challenging activities such as an entrepreneurial quiz game, completing a blueprint for a teen club, participating in an auction of businesses, and creating entrepreneur profile card
 
Mock Interviews at Social Justice High School 
Date & Time: February 4th and 5th 
Address: 3120 S Kostner Ave, Chicago, IL 60623
Volunteer Coordinator: Stephanie Ramirez, at sramirez@jachicago.org or at 773-640-3462
Information: Looking for professionals to act as mock interviewers for Social Justice HS seniors. 
 
Career Day at Holy Trinity High School
Date & Time: February 7th, 2019 8:00am-9:30am
Address: 1443 W Division St, Chicago, IL 60642
Volunteer Coordinator: Yanarilys Rodriguez, at yrodriguez@jachicago.org or at 312-715-1300 EXT 209
Information: Looking for professionals of all backgrounds to share their career path and education background with students. Volunteers will speak to two classes of students throughout the day.
 
Career Fair at Excel Academy of Englewood
Date & Time: February 7th, 2019 8:30am-12:00pm
Address: 7141 S Morgan St, Chicago, IL 60621
Volunteer Coordinator: Naomi Johnson, at njohnson@jachicago.org or at 708-819-4076
Information: Looking for professionals of all backgrounds to share information about their company or organization. You will have your own table and students will visit companies that they have an interest in. Please consider bringing giveaways, a tablecloth, informational materials, business cards, demonstrations etc.
 
Career Fair at Ombudsman Chicago South
Date & Time: February 13th, 10:00am-2:00pm
Address: 6057 S Western Ave, Chicago, IL 60636
Volunteer Coordinator: Naomi Johnson, at njohnson@jachicago.org or at 708-819-4076
Information: Looking for professionals that have received an automotive or technology certification to speak to students about their career path and education background. You will have your own table and students will visit organizations that they have an interest in. Please consider bringing giveaways, a tablecloth, informational materials, business cards, demonstrations etc. Lunch is provided for volunteers.
 
Career Day Lunch & Learn at Lakeview High School
Date & Time: February 20th, 9:15am- 1:10pm
Address: 4015 N Ashland Ave, Chicago, IL 60613
Volunteer Coordinator: Valerie Garcia, at vgarcia@jachicago.org or at 312-715-1300 EXT 229
Information: Looking for professional to come and talk to multiple students during their lunch period about their personal and professional journey. During this time, students will have a chance to ask the volunteer questions and get exposed to what it is like to work in the volunteer’s career field. Pictures and student giveaways are encouraged but not required. 
 
Career Day at Instituto Del Progreso Latino
Date & Time: February 22th, 9:00am- 2:00pm
Address: 2570 S Blue Island Ave, Chicago, IL 60608
Volunteer Coordinator: Stephanie Ramirez, at sramirez@jachicago.org or at 773-640-3462
Information: Looking for professionals of all backgrounds to share their career path and education background with students. Volunteers will speak to two classes of students throughout the day. 
 
Black History Month at Robert Morris University
Date & Time: February 22rd 9:30am-1:00pm
Address: 401 S State St, Chicago, IL 60605
Volunteer Coordinator: Naomi Johnson, at njohnson@jachicago.org or at 708-819-4076
Information: Looking for volunteers that identify as black to volunteer for JA’s Black History Month event! We want to inspire students by connecting them with black professional role models in Chicago. Lunch will be provided for volunteers.
1. Speak on a Career Panel in order to demonstrate the diverse career paths that they can take. (One volunteer per organization or company please!)
2. Teach a JA workshop. (Volunteers will teach the workshop 4 times)

MARCH

Resume Workshop at Maria Catalyst High School 
Date & Time: March 11th, 8:00am- 3:40pm
Address: 6727 S California Ave, Chicago, IL 606298
Volunteer Coordinator: Stephanie Ramirez, at sramirez@jachicago.org or at 773-640-3462
Information: Looking for professionals leading a resume workshop. Volunteers can share tips on how to make students’ resumes more appealing.
 
Career Day at Disney II Magnet High School
Date & Time: March 14th, 8:30am- 1:00pm
Address: 3900 Lawndale Ave, Chicago, IL 60618
Volunteer Coordinator: Valerie Garcia, at vgarcia@jachicago.org or at 312-715-1300 EXT 229
Information: Looking for professionals of all backgrounds to share their career path and education background with students. Volunteers will speak to multiple classes of students throughout the day.
 
Career Day at Maria Catalyst High School 
Date & Time: March 15th, 9:00am- 10:30am
Address: 6727 S California Ave, Chicago, IL 606298
Volunteer Coordinator: Stephanie Ramirez, at sramirez@jachicago.org or at 773-640-3462
Information: Looking for professionals of all backgrounds to share their career path and education background with students.
 
Career Week at Richardson Middle School
Date & Time: March 18th- 22nd, Time: TBD
Address: 6018 S Karlov Ave, Chicago, IL 60629
Volunteer Coordinator: Valerie Garcia, at vgarcia@jachicago.org or at 312-715-1300 EXT 229
Information: Looking for volunteers from diverse professions and backgrounds to talk to our students about their personal and professional journeys. Volunteers are free to volunteers during any or all days within this week. 
 
Career Fair at Ombudsman Chicago South
Date & Time: March 19th, 10:00am-2:00pm
Address: 6057 S Western Ave, Chicago, IL 60636
Volunteer Coordinator: Naomi Johnson, at njohnson@jachicago.org or at 708-819-4076
Information: Looking for professionals with a background in Culinary Arts, Hospitality, Construction, and Technology to speak to students about their career path and education background. You will have your own table and students will visit organizations that they have an interest in. Please consider bringing giveaways, a tablecloth, informational materials, business cards, demonstrations etc. Lunch is provided for volunteers.
 
Career Day Lunch & Learn at Lakeview High School
Date & Time: March 20th, 9:15am- 1:10pm
Address: 4015 N Ashland Ave, Chicago, IL 60613
Volunteer Coordinator: Valerie Garcia, at vgarcia@jachicago.org or at 312-715-1300 EXT 229
Information: Looking for professional to come and talk to multiple students during their lunch period about their personal and professional journey. During this time, students will have a chance to ask the volunteer questions and get exposed to what it is like to work in the volunteer’s career field. Pictures and student giveaways are encouraged but not required. 
 
Career Fair at Butler College Prep High School
Date & Time: Wednesday, March 22nd. Time TBD
Address: 821 E 103rd St, Chicago, IL 60628
Volunteer Coordinator: Naomi Johnson, at njohnson@jachicago.org or at 708-819-4076
Information: Looking for professionals of color from all backgrounds to share their career path and education background with students. Please consider bringing giveaways, a tablecloth, informational materials, business cards, demonstrations etc.
 
Career Fair at Excel Academy of South Shore
Date & Time: March 27th 9:45am-2:00pm
Address: 7530 S South Shore Dr, Chicago, IL 60649
Volunteer Coordinator: Naomi Johnson, at njohnson@jachicago.org or at 708-819-4076
Information: Looking for professionals of all backgrounds to share information about their company or organization. You will have your own table and students will visit companies that they have an interest in. Please consider bringing giveaways, a tablecloth, informational materials, business cards, demonstrations etc.
 
Hansberry College Prep Hiring Day Mock Interviewing
Date & Time: March 29th Time TBD
Address: 8748 S Aberdeen St, Chicago, IL 60620
Volunteer Coordinator: Naomi Johnson | njohnson@jachicago.org | 708-819-4076
Information: Looking for volunteers to act as mock interviewers for Hansberry College Prep seniors. This is a culminating event after Hansberry students have participated in career readiness seminars.  

APRIL

Career Day at Phoenix Military Academy
Date & Time: April 12th, 9:00am-1:12pm
Address: 145 S. Campbell Ave, Chicago, IL 60612
Volunteer Coordinator: Yanarilys Rodriguez, at yrodriguez@jachicago.org or at 312-715-1300 EXT 209
Information: Looking for professionals of all backgrounds to share their career path and education background with students. Volunteers will be in a classroom with other volunteers in their career clusters to talk to the students and answer their questions. 
 
Career Fair at Ombudsman Chicago South
Date & Time: April 23rd, 10:00am-2:00pm
Address: 6057 S Western Ave, Chicago, IL 60636
Volunteer Coordinator: Naomi Johnson | njohnson@jachicago.org | 708-819-4076
Information: Looking for professionals with a background in Healthcare to speak to students about their career path and education background. You will have your own table and students will visit organizations that they have an interest in. Please consider bringing giveaways, a tablecloth, informational materials, business cards, demonstrations etc. Lunch is provided for volunteers.
 
Career Day Lunch & Learn at Lakeview High School
Date & Time: April 24th, 9:15am- 1:10pm
Address: 4015 N Ashland Ave, Chicago, IL 60613
Volunteer Coordinator: Valerie Garcia, at vgarcia@jachicago.org or at 312-715-1300 EXT 229
Information: Looking for professional to come and talk to multiple students during their lunch period about their personal and professional journey. During this time, students will have a chance to ask the volunteer questions and get exposed to what it is like to work in the volunteer’s career field. Pictures and student giveaways are encouraged but not required. 
 
Career Day at Farragut Career Academy High School
Date & Time: April 25th 
Address: 2345 S Christiana Ave, Chicago, IL 60623
Volunteer Coordinator: Stephanie Ramirez, at sramirez@jachicago.org or at 773-640-3462
Information: Looking for professionals of all backgrounds to share their career path and education background with students. 
 
Career Day at Chicago Military Academy High School
Date & Time: April 25th 1:15pm-3:15pm
Address: 3519 S Giles Ave, Chicago, IL 60653
Volunteer Coordinator: Naomi Johnson | njohnson@jachicago.org | 708-819-4076
Information: Looking for professionals of all backgrounds to share their career path and education background with students. Please sign up for this event in advance as students have the opportunity to select which volunteers they will hear from according to their interests.
 
Speed Networking at Robert Morris University
Date & Time: April 26th, 8:30am- 11:00am
Address: 401 S State St, Chicago, IL 60605
Volunteer Coordinator: Valerie Garcia, at vgarcia@jachicago.org or at 312-715-1300 EXT 229
Information: Looking for volunteers to join us for our annual “Get Hired” Competition for our speed networking portion. Volunteers will have a chance to interact with high school students and help them practice the networking process. Volunteers are encouraged to bring business cards with them to give to the students. 
 

MAY

Career Day at Hirsch High School
Date & Time: May 2nd, 10:15am-3:15pm
Address: 7740 S Ingleside Ave, Chicago, IL 60619
Volunteer Coordinator: Naomi Johnson | njohnson@jachicago.org | 708-819-4076
Information: Looking for professionals of all backgrounds to share their career path and education background with students. Volunteers will speak to several classes of students throughout the event. Lunch is provided for volunteers
 
College & Career Fair at Ombudsman Chicago South
Date & Time: May 7th, 10:00am-2:00pm
Address: 6057 S Western Ave, Chicago, IL 60636
Volunteer Coordinator: Naomi Johnson | njohnson@jachicago.org | 708-819-4076
Information: Looking for professionals of all backgrounds to share information about their company or organization. You will have your own table and students will visit companies that they have an interest in. Please consider bringing giveaways, a tablecloth, informational materials, business cards, demonstrations etc. Lunch is provided for volunteers.
 
Career Day at Chicago High School for Agricultural Sciences
Date & Time: May 10th, 8:00am-12:30pm
Address: 3857 W 111th St, Chicago, IL 60655
Volunteer Coordinator: Naomi Johnson | njohnson@jachicago.org | 708-819-4076
Information: Looking for professionals of all backgrounds to share their career path and education background with students. Volunteers will speak to several classes of students throughout the day. Lunch is provided for volunteers
 
Career Day Lunch & Learn at Lakeview High School
Date & Time: May 15th, 9:15am- 1:10pm
Address: 4015 N Ashland Ave, Chicago, IL 60613
Volunteer Coordinator: Valerie Garcia, at vgarcia@jachicago.org or at 312-715-1300 EXT 229
Information: Looking for professional to come and talk to multiple students during their lunch period about their personal and professional journey. During this time, students will have a chance to ask the volunteer questions and get exposed to what it is like to work in the volunteer’s career field. Pictures and student giveaways are encouraged but not required. 
 
SOJO to RMU
Date & Time: May 17th, 9:30am- 2:00pm
Address: 401 S. State St. Chicago, IL 60605
Volunteer Coordinator: Stephanie Ramirez, at sramirez@jachicago.org or (773) 640-3462
Information: Looking for professional to lead workshops career readiness workshops. Students are in need of developing their work readiness soft skills. 
 
 

JA Scholarship Applications Are Open!

Junior Achievement of Chicago awards multiple scholarships to deserving high school students. Please click on each scholarship opportunity for details, deadlines, and application instructions. Please note, all applicants are required to have participated in Junior Achievement of Chicago programs.

1. Colonel Henry Crown Scholarship

2. JA General Scholarships (use Crown Scholarship application)

3. JA High School Heroes Scholarships and Application

4. JA Company Program Team Lead Scholarship

New JA Program Teaches Students to Earn, Save, Spend & Donate

Junior Achievement of Chicago is launching the newly designed elementary school program, JA Our City featuring Cha-ChingTM, made possible by the generosity of Jackson Charitable Foundation. 

The upgraded program incorporates the Foundation’s signature program, Cha-ChingTM Money Smart Kids, which is a series of three-minute music videos about making real-world money decisions. JA and the Foundation’s partnership integrated Cha-Ching videos and lessons into the JA Our City entrepreneurship, financial literacy and work-preparedness program, which is taught in classrooms to approximately 450,000 third-grade students across the country annually.  To inspire financial learning beyond the classroom, the program includes take-home activities for kids and their parents.

A survey conducted by Wakefield Research for Junior Achievement and the Jackson Charitable Foundation revealed that when it comes to money, kids as old as 10 admit they still have a lot to learn.

According to the JA-Jackson Children’s Financial Literacy Survey which included 500 children seven to 10 years of age and their parents, 33 percent of the young respondents haven’t been taught how to earn money, 41 percent haven’t been taught how to spend money, and 47 percent have not learned how to give money to help people. When asked why they think people put money in a bank, only 53 percent selected the answer of saving it so they won’t spend it. Only 25 percent know you can earn interest on savings.

“The message to parents is simple,” said Maria Ramos, VP of City Operations for JA of Chicago. “It’s never too early to teach your children the short and long-term rewards of saving and spending money wisely.”

The results also demonstrate kids’ awareness about and interest in money, even at a young age. When asked how people earn money, 91 percent of kids responded that people get money from working at a job. Fifty-five percent of kids say they are excited when adults talk about money. Most are knowledgeable about the basics of money, including how to count and save money – likely, in part, due to 82 percent of kids earning an allowance for doing chores, earning good grades, completing homework and simply being kind to others.

 “When it comes to kids and their financial futures, we must begin by encouraging more conversations about the choices we all have around money,” said Jackson Charitable Foundation Executive Director Danielle Robinson. “Adults have the ability to pass along advice and guidance to young people about how to earn, save, spend and donate money — this advice can be life-changing. Jackson Charitable Foundation is thrilled to partner with Junior Achievement to spark more of those important conversations at home and in the classroom.”

According to the survey, parents are open to discussion. The majority (77 percent) believe that money is the easiest to explain to their child, compared to other topics kids inquire about such as where babies come from, death and even politics. The same percentage (77 percent) of parents feel the best place for children to learn the basics of personal finance is at home, at the average age of eight years old and as young as five. And, 92 percent of parents are themselves saving money – for emergencies, college tuition and retirement, followed by vacations and cars and other large purchases.

Methodology

The Junior Achievement-Jackson Financial Literacy Surveys were conducted by Wakefield Research (www.wakefieldresearch.com) among 500 U.S. children ages 7-10 and 500 parents of U.S. children ages 7-10, between March 21 and March 27, 2017, using an email invitation and an online survey. 

Results of any sample are subject to sampling variation. The magnitude of the variation is measurable and is affected by the number of interviews and the level of the percentages expressing the results.  For the interviews conducted in this particular study, the chances are 95 in 100 that a survey result does not vary, plus or minus, by more than 4.4 percentage points in each audience from the result that would be obtained if interviews had been conducted with all persons in the universe represented by the sample.

Majority of Teens are Worried About their Parents’ Preparedness to Retire, Know Little About Planning for their Own Retirement

A new survey by Junior Achievement USA and AIG finds that nearly two-thirds (63 percent) of teens are concerned about their parents’ preparedness for retirement while demonstrating a lack of education about their own. Sixty-nine percent of young adults ages 13-18 say they know little or nothing about financial planning.

“Based on the fact that teens are concerned about their parents’ retirements, one might think that today’s young people would be more focused on gaining a better understanding of money management, but these results show that’s not necessarily the case,” said Maria Ramos, VP of City Operations. “The most important message for teens is that by having a plan, and an understanding of what it means to retire well, they will be better positioned for their own retirements when that time comes. This is especially important as Americans are living longer than previous generations”

When asked what they plan to do after they retire, teens cited traveling, hobbies such as golf or crafts, volunteering, and splurging on RVs or vacation homes as their top choices. More than a third (34%) of respondents think they will retire at age 60 or younger; however, one-third believe they will need less than $5,000 saved to retire and on average the teens plan to start saving for retirement at age 29. 

In addition, 46 percent of teens are not confident they know how to plan for retirement. But teens’ lack of understanding about financial and retirement planning does not translate into a lack of understanding about the imperativeness of planning. Ninety-three percent say it is important to have a financial plan for retirement, and 92 percent find value in taking a personal finance class in high school.

When asked to identify descriptions and benefits of financial products such as 401ks, annuities, and social security, nearly half (49%) were able to correctly match 401ks, one-third (33%) were right about annuities, and less than two-third (61%) about Social Security.  Definitions, though, are just the start of any education process and help is needed in the application: While many could define an annuity, less than one-quarter (21%) of teens identified annuities as a protected source of lifetime income compared to bank deposits, stocks and mutual funds—none of which can provide protected income that cannot be outlived. And only about half (51%) were somewhat confident that Social Security will still exist when it’s time for them to retire.  

“We are on a mission to ensure that every American achieves a secure, fulfilling retirement, and that includes kids. The findings we uncovered with Junior Achievement make it clear that we must work with parents and educators to provide teens with greater financial education so they can truly understand what it takes to plan for and achieve the retirements they desire,” said Rob Scheinerman, President of Group Retirement for AIG. “Whether for teens or adults, through the work we do with Junior Achievement and other financial literacy efforts we support, we want to help people gain a deeper understanding of the importance of lifetime income, realize the true cost of retirement, and develop a solid plan for the future.”

To gain the knowledge they need for information about investing for retirement, teens say they would first go to their parents, closely followed by a financial advisor or banker, other family member, teacher, or friend.

Quick Facts:

  • 63% are concerned about their parents’ preparedness for retirement
  • 69% say they know little or nothing about financial planning
  • 93% say it is important to have a financial plan for retirement
  • 72% say they would likely consult a financial advisor about planning for retirement
  • 34% expect to retire at age 60 or younger
  • 30% agreed $5000 or less was enough money to retire
  • The average age teens report they will begin saving for retirement at is 29
  • 46% are not confident they know how to plan for retirement
  • Nearly all (92-95%) students agreed that a personal finance course would be valuable to them

Methodological Notes:

The JA/AIG Survey was conducted by Wakefield Research (www.wakefieldresearch.com) among 1,000 nationally representative U.S. teens, ages 13-18, who are not currently enrolled in college, between August 13 and August 20, 2018, using an email invitation and an online survey.  Results of any sample are subject to sampling variation. The magnitude of the variation is measurable and is affected by the number of interviews and the level of the percentages expressing the results. For the interviews conducted in this particular study, the chances are 95 in 100 that a survey result does not vary, plus or minus, by more than 3.1 percentage points from the result that would be obtained if interviews had been conducted with all persons in the universe represented by the sample.

FactSet Empowers the Future at McPherson Elementary School

On June 13th, FactSet employees spent the day at McPherson Elementary School in Chicago, teaching students about financial literacy, work readiness, and entrepreneurship. Earlier this year, JA was awarded a grant from the company to help with the cost of delivering JA programs to McPherson.

Volunteer Jeff Koeneman first learned about JA when we came to his grade school many years ago and was reacquainted with the organization through FaceSet's corporate social responsibility initiative. He worked with the school's 7th grade students and said he enjoyed guiding the students through "how to take their skills and interest to define a career path."

 

 

Josephine Reinhardt volunteered in a 6th grade classroom and taught the JA Global Marketplace program. Thought a bit overwhelmed at first, she enjoys working with kids and was excited to volunteer. She believes JA is important for today's youth since it "exposes students to new topics that are applicable to their lives."

Veronica, a 7th grade McPherson student, was pleasantly surprised by her JA experience. "[The class] at first expected [JA] to be relatively boring, but it turned out to be very fine. We learned a lot from [the volunteers] about money and saving," she said. And the program had quite the impact on her- she said after having FactSet volunteers in her classroom delivering the JA program, she saved money for the first time!

McPherson student Jennifer said her take-away from the program is how to count money, as it will help her when she gets a "high school job."

Jose Gonzalez, a 7th grade teacher at McPherson, says that "programs like JA are important because today's youth need guidance and exposure into what the future holds, what they need to do, as well as what needs to be done in order to be prepared for the 21st Century." He has been teaching for 30 years and has signed up his classroom for JA each year. He believes that the volunteers, like those from FactSet, bring an unqiue value to his classroom and show students the kinds of careers and possibilities available to them.

Thank you, FactSet, for volunteering!

JA of Chicago Receives Grant from the Achievement Foundation

Colorado Springs, Colo. — JA of Chicago has received a grant from The Achievement Foundation. The Achievement Foundation has announced the awarding of Hugh B. Sweeny Jr. Grants totaling $585,000 over two years to Junior Achievement offices in 13 communities across the country. The grants will support the expansion of the JA Company Program®, JA's premier entrepreneurship education initiative, which offers teens the chance to start and run student-led businesses. Each JA office will receive a $25,000 grant for the first year, with a second year grant of $20,000. Grants will be used for the hiring of a staff member whose time is dedicated to the growth of the JA Company Program in that community.

The recipient communities are:

  • JA of Arkansas (Arkansas)
  • JA of the Central Carolinas (Charlotte, NC)
  • JA of Central Florida (Orlando, FL)
  • JA of Central Maryland (Baltimore, MD)
  • JA of Central Texas (Austin, TX)
  • JA of Chicago (Chicago, IL)
  • JA of Delaware (Delaware)
  • JA of Greater Washington (Washington, D.C.)
  • JA of the Michigan Great Lakes (Grand Rapids, MI)
  • JA of South Florida (Ft. Lauderdale, FL)
  • JA of Southwest New England (Hartford, CT)
  • JA of Northern New England (Boston, MA)
  • JA of the Upper Midwest (Minneapolis/St. Paul, MN)

"Entrepreneurship is critical to the long-term well-being of our nation," said Maria Ramos, VP of Chicago Operations for JA of Chicago. "We greatly appreciate the Achievement Foundation's investment in helping our young people discover what it means to be an entrepreneur."

The Hugh B. Sweeny Jr. award is named after Hugh B., "Jim," Sweeny, Jr. who served Junior Achievement for more than 32 years, including many years as National Program Director. During his tenure, Mr. Sweeny managed and expanded the National Junior Achievers Conference from 60 participants in 1948 to more than 3,000 delegates in 1977. 

About the Achievement Foundation

The Achievement Foundation, Inc. was formed almost 60 years ago to receive grants, gifts, and bequests for the giving of financial aid for charitable, scientific or educational programs to groups or clubs of boys and girls for the purpose of encouraging them in productive enterprises. The Foundation is exempt from income taxes under Section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. As such, it is exempt from state and federal income taxes on income related to its tax-exempt purpose and contributions to the Foundation are deductible as charitable contributions for income tax purposes. The Foundation has had a long-standing (albeit non-exclusive) relationship with Junior Achievement through contributions and providing loans to local JA areas in need of financial assistance. Over the past few years, the Foundation has broadened its programs and activities to include grants.  

Interview with JA Volunteer Antonio Perez, Associated Bank Manager

This article is posted courtesy of our JA partners at Associated Bank.

How long have you been doing financial education volunteerism?

I can say that I’ve been doing it for many, many years—at least 30. I started with Junior Achievement after I came to the bank and had volunteered with other financial education organizations before that. It was just something that I have wanted to do and is a good fit for me.

 

What inspired you to get involved?
I am a firm believer in giving back. It is just the way I was raised and a part of who I am. It’s also a lot of fun and feels really good. I think that if you can impact just one person when you give a presentation—that they can walk away feeling like they’ve learned something—you know you did your job. I teach kids as young as five years old. Being in front of them and sharing my knowledge and expertise is the best feeling, and you can only experience it if you try it.
 
Why did you choose financial education over other types of volunteerism?
I felt comfortable with it because I work in banking. That level of confidence has grown over time and I now tailor my conversations based on individuals’ needs. I have been involved with other organizations in my community which has allowed me to see where the true needs are. When choosing an organization for yourself, you have to assess your skills as well as your community needs, and find the best fit. My motto is to get involved, stay involved and give back. When I look back, that is my single, proudest achievement.

What importance does financial education play in the community?
When I think back to my schooling, we never had someone speak to us about financial education. I feel that if I had been exposed to it at a younger age, it would have had a bigger impression on me. There are a lot of things we can teach the young and old alike that will benefit their lives. Financial education empowers people to make decisions that improve their financial wellbeing. I wish I had an opportunity like that when I was younger, and I am happy to bring that to others now.

Colleagues in the Chicago area are heavily involved in financial education. Can you tell us more about that initiative?
Every spring and fall, our region dedicates volunteers to teach financial education in the local schools. I am involved in securing and promoting the sessions and work a lot with the Junior Achievement representatives to do so. As a region, we have devoted many hours volunteering in the community because of our partnership with Junior Achievement.

How did your region first get involved with this initiative?
I had been known in the community as someone who is passionate about financial education. About three years ago, Junior Achievement approached us with their need for financial education volunteers. We were highly interested in collaborating with this organization, so my District Manager reached out to me to spearhead the effort and I ran with it. We are currently working with two of our local schools: Huff Elementary and Hillcrest, which is new to us this year.

What advice would you give colleagues wanting to volunteer in their community?
Get involved. We all have certain skills that others can benefit from. It would be a shame if we never shared those with others. Just thinking of the next generation, they could really learn and incorporate our experiences into what they do and become. That knowledge can then cascade to the next generation and so on. Giving back feels good because you can potentially impact the lives of so many people.

Robert Morris Alumnus Turns Service Learning Into a Career

 

Edgar Montes (2015 Alumnus) was born in Guerrero, Mexico and moved to the United States at age six without knowing any English. It was a big struggle for him to overcome during his elementary and middle school years. He believes the best years of his educational experiences were at RMU because he was able to meet new friends and professors that were a big part of his success.

 

Edgar's first experience with Junior Achievement of Chicago (JA) was during his undergraduate program at RMU's Elgin campus. Edgar volunteered at two schools, inspiring kids as he taught real-world skills in financial literacy, work readiness and entrepreneurship. This experience led him to his current position at JA as the Operations Manager of their Western Division. In this role he has been able to come back to the Elgin campus, coordinating volunteer events for current RMU students. Recently he worked with more than 50 student volunteers in Elgin-area schools. According to Edgar, "It's always an honor being able to work with Robert Morris University students because I get to share my personal experiences and offer advice to them."

RMU is the #1 University volunteer in the Nation for Junior Achievement, recently receiving the Silver President's Volunteer Service Award for contributing over 10,000 volunteer hours to JA.

This article was written and orginally published by Robert Morris University.

Only Half of Teens Say Gaining Financial Independence from Parents is a Goal for the Future

A new survey by Junior Achievement USA and AIG finds that only half of teens cite becoming financially independent of parents as one of their future goals. The 2018 JA Teens & Personal Finance Survey offers insight into how this generation is thinking about and planning for their financial future while emphasizing the value of financial literacy and personal finance programs. 
 
“Millennials have sometimes been referred to as ‘the Boomerang Generation’ because during the economic recovery many moved back home with their parents after college due to a weak job market and student loan debt,” said Maria Ramos, VP of Operations of JA of Chicago. “This survey may be showing that today’s teens, Generation Z, could be seeing that as a situation they will encounter down the road.”
 
Among the survey results, teens stated their financial goals for the future include: graduating from college (75%), creating a savings plan (50%), affording international travel (37%), starting a business (30%), and retiring before age 65 (29%). 
 
Teens were also asked to share their concerns for the future. Top concerns were: being able to pay for college (54%), finding a fulfilling and well-paying job (52%), not being able to afford their own home (49%), not having skills to manage money (42%), and not having savings for an emergency (41%). Girls who took the survey tended to have higher levels of concern than did the boys. 
 
“It’s apparent from these findings that today’s youth think a lot about their financial futures, and are looking for ways to be better prepared to be successful at managing money,” said Laura Gallagher, Global Head of Corporate Citizenship at AIG. “One way AIG is helping on this front is by partnering with organizations like Junior Achievement to get young people the information they need to be more prepared and to feel more confident about their futures.”
 
According to the survey, 95 percent of teens would value personal finance programs being taught in their schools. Currently, most teens get their financial advice from their parents or guardians (72%), followed by online resources including social media (33%), family members other than parents or grandparents (31%), and friends (28%). Only 18 percent currently seek out this information from their high school guidance counselor and 14 percent from a professional financial advisor. 
 

VOLUNTEER PARTNERS HONORED WITH A U.S. PRESIDENT'S VOLUNTEER SERVICE AWARD

This week, we honored six Chicago-based organizations with the 2016-2017 U.S. President's Volunteer Service Award for providing at least 5,000 volunteer hours to local Junior Achievement offices during the 2016-2017 school year. The U.S. President's Volunteer Service Award was presented to 57 organizations at an evening awards ceremony during the JA Volunteer Summit, presented by American Express, on March 13, 2018 in New York, NY.

In 2003, President George W. Bush established the President's Council on Service and Civic Participation (the Council) to recognize the valuable contributions volunteers make in communities and encourage more people to serve. The Council created the President's Volunteer Service Award program as a way to thank and honor individuals who, by their demonstrated commitment and example, inspire others to engage in volunteer service. In 2006, Junior Achievement became an official certifying organization for this award, which recognizes corporations with a U.S. presence that provide volunteers to teach JA programs anywhere in the world.

The comanies honored in Chicago were: Allstate Insurance Company (pictured), Robert Morris University - Illinois, The Y, Accenture, Caterpillar Inc., and Grant Thornton.

"Junior Achievement volunteers are important mentors for young people, bringing our programs to life. JA volunteers share their experiences and skills with students while delivering our programs, teaching them how to manage their money, succeed in the workforce, or start a business that creates jobs and grows the economy. JA’s volunteers are critical to our organization’s success and are a vital part of our mission," said Sandy Daffé, President of Junior Achievement of Chicago.

Junior Achievement’s kindergarten through high school programs are delivered across the country by a network of more than 243,000 volunteers, including over 14,000 in the Chicago area. The complete list of recipients can be found here.

 

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