Current Events | JA In The News | Junior Achievement USA

JA BizTown Inspires Student to Become a Doctor

San Diego Girl Doctor 3Ashlyn’s excitement was building more and more each day as the JA BizTown visit came closer and closer—she was thrilled that she would be “Doctor No.1 at Kaiser.” On the day of the field trip, she made sure she packed her play medical kit and was ready for her busy day at the office. The expression on her face from just walking through the doors into her “hospital” was ecstatic. Jacqui Pernicano, vice president of operations and marketing from Junior Achievement of San Diego County, shared Ashlyn’s story.

Ashlyn had a great time giving all her patients their check-ups, making her diagnoses, and couldn’t stop talking about her experience during the drive home. When Ashlyn got home she couldn’t wait to tell her older sister all about JA BizTown

“Your program made such an impact on Ashlyn with building her self-esteem and drive to become a real doctor someday,” Ashlyn’s mom Wendy said. “When Ashlyn sees anything that has Kaiser's name or logo, she tells everyone in the vicinity that she worked there as ‘Doctor No.1’ and about her duties as a doctor and that she filled in for the CEO when one was out.

San Diego Girl Doctor 2“I would like to take this opportunity to say thank you for allowing me to volunteer with my daughter’s class,” Wendy said. “The programs like yours give children like Ashlyn the little boost of encouragement to go after things they may think are beyond their reach. I look forward to volunteering again.”

 

Horticulture Teaches More than Just How to Care for Plants

Ms. Curcio and Mr. Oliphant with sophomore Achiever Laguon Thompson who is preparing material for planters.

Ms. Curcio and Mr. Oliphant with sophomore Achiever Laguon Thompson who is preparing material for planters.

Since 1999, Ann Curcio, a vocational specialist with the Bridgeport Board of Education, has changed lives through her work with the most challenged special-needs students in the city’s school system. Bernadine Venditto, president of Junior Achievement of Western Connecticut, shared this story of how Ann has recognized the dire need for a job skills training program for these students, and how she has embarked on a 15-year collaboration with the JA Job Shadow program.

During those 15 years, more than 1,300 students with learning challenges have been able to develop needed skills to enter the workforce upon graduation from high school. Junior Achievement is uniquely positioned to help close the workforce skills gap and to equip students with the skills they need to be career-ready.

The Roaring Lions Enterprises Achievers hard at work in the Pivot greenhouse, readying their products for sale.

The Roaring Lions Enterprises Achievers hard at work in the Pivot greenhouse, readying their products for sale.

For the past three years, Ann has worked alongside Dennis Oliphant, Greenhouse Manager of Pivot Ministries in Bridgeport, Conn., to provide hands-on skills in horticulture and gardening. By adapting the traditional JA Company Program to meet the skill levels of the students, this adviser team has guided the Roaring Lions Enterprises JA company through the formation, management, and conclusion of three successful company cycles. The happiest part for the students was the dividend payout at the end of the year!

Through hands-on experiences like growing their own plants and selling them to customers like they did at their Mother’s Day/Spring plant sale, these high school students are receiving relevant, hands-on experiences so they can own their economic success and plan for their futures.

 

Ms. Curcio and several Achievers working at their Mother’s Day/Spring plant sale, May 10, 2013, at Bassick High School in Bridgeport, CT.

Ms. Curcio and several Achievers working at their Mother’s Day/Spring plant sale, May 10, 2013, at Bassick High School in Bridgeport, CT.

JA Financial Literacy No Snow Job

It is sometimes surprising for volunteers to realize how much material is retained by Junior Achievement students following a JA program. Often a student’s financial literacy is understood only as new concepts and vocabulary naturally work into a student’s daily activities. Tovah Lisky, marketing director at Junior Achievement of Northeastern New York, recently shared a humorous exchange between a father and son that is proof positive JA concepts are understood and lived in snowy Upstate New York.

Person shoveling snowRobert Clancy is president of Spiral Design Studio in Albany, N.Y., and has served on his local JA board of directors for 16 years. A JA alumnus, Clancy developed and designed his JA Area’s website and provides a pro bono design each year for the JA Area’s annual report. His son, Sean, has been attending Bell Top Elementary School in Troy, N.Y. 

Life for a young person in Troy is a typical balance of fun and responsibility. Troy is situated on the Hudson River and is surrounded by hardwood forests. In the winter, a particularly taxing responsibility is snow shoveling. Every year, about 35 days of snow deposit about 60 inches for Sean to clear from around his home. On one such morning, the elder Clancy asked his son to help shovel the driveway.

He explained, “Applying the financial literacy skills he learned in his first-grade Junior Achievement class, Sean smirked and asked me, ‘Dad. Is this request a NEED or a WANT?’ Without missing a beat, I smiled back and said, ‘It’s both. You NEED to shovel and I WANT you to do it.’”

Jim Sweeny Honored by Princeton University

Hugh B. “Jim” Sweeny, Jr., with Princeton University President Shirley M. Tilghman.

Hugh B. “Jim” Sweeny, Jr., with Princeton University President Shirley M. Tilghman

Jim Sweeny-Princeton Alumnus Honoree

Hugh B. “Jim” Sweeny, Jr. served Junior Achievement for more than 32 years, including many years as National Program Director. During his tenure, Sweeny managed and expanded the National Junior Achievers Conference (NAJAC) from 60 participants in 1948 to more than 3,000 delegates in 1977. 

On June 1, 2013, Jim was honored as the oldest living member (98 years old) of the oldest graduating class (1935) at the annual Princeton University Alumni celebration. At a special Old Guard luncheon hosted by dignitaries of the University, Jim was awarded membership in the Society of the Claw, which bestows upon the recipient a Claw cane dating back to 1863. Watch a video of the award ceremony and his speech by clicking here.

Claw cane in tow, Jim led a parade (P-rade) before 25,000 eager Princeton graduates and their supporters. The roar of the crowd cheering him on was deafening (no exaggeration) as he was driven through the mile-long parade route to the stadium. What an honor! Congratulations, Jim!

Jim & Johnny waiting to lead the P-rade at the annual Princeton University Alumni celebration on June 1, 2013.

Jim & Johnny waiting to lead the P-rade at the annual Princeton University Alumni celebration on June 1, 2013

1942-45: The War Years

The youth power was an asset which could be harnessed to the war effort. After all, JA had the skills, the tools, the machinery, the motivation, and the youth. All Junior Achievement had to do was match these assets up with the need. So JA companies "went to war" and produced many different parts according to specifications of local plants.

In Chicago, the enterprising JA companies got a contract to manufacture 10,000 pants hangers for the Army. They earned not only a decent profit, but a lot of publicity as well. In Pittsburgh, an asbestos-lined box for carting off incendiary bombs was approved by the Civil Defense and sold locally. There was also the manufacture of baby incubators. The adult companies making these incubators were into war products and had reduced the production, causing a shortage. With the help of medical authorities, a wooden incubator was designed and approved. Yet another JA company located an abandoned locomotive and obtained permission to go into the scrap metal business. They used acetylene torches to cut it apart for badly needed scrap iron.

Gen. Douglas MacArthur on a JA tour of duty

The shortage of many items provided all sorts of opportunities for Achievers with ingenuity to find new and different products. This provided an incentive to many teenagers and probably had much to do with the fact that Achiever membership during the war years remained relatively high.

Click the link below to read more about Junior Achievement during World War II from the book, "Junior Achievement A History," by Joseph J. Francomano.

1942-45 The War Years

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